CALL FOR PAPERS:

The Spatial Imagination in Postwar and Contemporary

American Literature and Art

 

A two-day international conference at the University of Strasbourg funded by the Institut Universitaire de France

Dates: 21-22 March 2024

Venue: University of Strasbourg, France

Confirmed keynote speaker: Dawn Raffel is a writer whose most recent book is Boundless as the Sky (2023).

Other keynote speakers TBC.

Seen as an emblematic feature of the United States, American space has been represented, interpreted and questioned along multiple lines. Yet, these lines of critical inquiry often remain separate and discrete, treated from perspectives that do not take into account their interaction. They are also spelt along a particularly white, male trajectory. While it is generally agreed that ‘space’ is a major component of the American imagination, literary representations and artistic practices of space in postwar US have rarely been treated together as intersecting narratives. This conference sets out to consider postwar and contemporary conceptualizations and material practices of space in American literature and art, with the prospect of opening larger and more interdisciplinary vistas. The conference builds on the 2018 conference in Paris on The cartographic imagination. Art, literature and mapping in the United States, 1945-1980.

What are the prevailing and the underrepresented spatial imaginaries in postwar and contemporary America, and how are they represented in literature and art? How do these expressions relate to various Indigenous and colonial traditions of the spatial imagination? How do issues of whiteness, race, and the racial imagination shape spatial practices and imaginaries? What does the dialogue between literary texts, visual studies and art historical practices bring to the understanding of the construction and experience of space in American postwar and contemporary contexts? What are the major paradigms that arise? How do national and transnational, local and global, official and alternative narratives of space intersect in literature and art? How do the contexts of US imperialism and militarization play out in the representation of Cold War and ‘war on terror’ geographies?

We invite proposals that highlight the ways in which literature and art, and more generally literary and art historical studies as disciplines, can be fruitfully and innovatively brought together and made to interact. This conference will be a venue for discussing interdisciplinary and creative methodologies. An important, exploratory aspect of the conference consists precisely in determining the possible intersections between art and literature that deserve to be further explored.

We invite interdisciplinary proposals on the following topics:

  • Intermediality and space;
  • The legacies of literary and artistic modernisms and their investigations of space;
  • Indigenous and minoritised spatial discourses and practices;
  • Spatial practice, whiteness, race;
  • US militarization, imperialism and Cold War geographies;
  • Popular literary and graphic genres and the spatial imagination;
  • Liminal spaces, meta-spaces, horizontal and vertical spaces;
  • Site-specificity and the disturbance of the gallery and museum;
  • Comparative literary and artistic representations of exploration, displacement and exile;
  • Alternative constructions of American geography;
  • Discourses of place informed by environmentalism and ecology in literature and art;
  • The local and the global;
  • Mapping and counter-mapping;
  • Artists’ writings and artistic practice;
  • The digital turn in literature and art, systems, cartographies;
  • The notion of “space” broadly (re)imagined.

We invite:

  • individual paper proposals for 20-minute papers (abstracts of no more than 350 words, plus 100-word biography)
  • panel proposals for 1.5 hour panels (panel abstracts of no more than 350 words, plus paper abstracts of no more than 250 words each, plus 100-word biographies). Panels of no more than 3 presenters are recommended.
  • suggestions of interdisciplinary panels or roundtables (a mix of critical and creative practitioners are welcome)

Please submit your proposals and biographies to Gwen Cressman (cressman@unistra.fr) and Monica Manolescu (manoles@unistra.fr) by September 30, 2023.

Registration for the conference will be free of charge.

Organizers: Sandrine Baudry (University of Strasbourg), Chloé Bour-Lang (University of Strasbourg), Gwen Cressman (University of Strasbourg), Catherine Gander (Maynooth University), Hélène Ibata (University of Strasbourg), Monica Manolescu (University of Strasbourg/Institut Universitaire de France), Will Norman (University of Kent).

 

With over 18,000 students and 2,000 members of staff, the University of Limerick (UL) is a research led and enterprising institution with a proud record in innovation and excellence in education, research and scholarship. The entrepreneurial and pioneering values which drive UL’s mission and strategy ensure that we capitalise on local, national and international engagement and connectivity. We are renowned for providing an outstanding student experience and conducting leading-edge research. Our commitment is to make a difference by shaping the future through educating and empowering our students.

With the River Shannon as a unifying focal point, UL is situated on a superb riverside campus of over 130 hectares. Outstanding recreational, cultural and sporting facilities further enhance the campus’s exceptional learning and research environment.

Applications are invited for the following position:

Faculty of Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences

School of English, Irish, and Communication

Teaching Assistant in English – 10 month fixed term contract

Salary: €34,273 p.a. pro rata

Further information for applicants and application material is available online from: www.ul.ie/hrvacancies

“A Teaching Assistant post in the University of Limerick operates as a training contract. Applications will only be considered from individuals who have not already received two Teaching Assistant contracts.”

The closing date for receipt of applications is Monday, 12th June 2023.

Applications must be completed online before 12 noon, Irish Standard Time on the closing date.

 

Further information can be found here.

 

 

 

Congratulations are in order to Michael Hinds and Jonathan Silverman on winning the Biennial IAAS Peggy OBrien Book Prize for their wonderful Johnny Cash International(published by University of Iowa Press). The prize winners were announced at the IAAS annual conference at University of Limerick. Presenting the prize, Chair of the IAAS, Catherine Gander, had this to say:

“I’m particularly delighted by this year’s winner of the biennial Peggy OBrien book prize, because it so eloquently captures the IAAS’s ethos of inclusivity, scholarly curiosity, and solidarity.  

We received some outstanding entries this year, but out of a very strong field of contenders, there was, however, one clear winner, on which the committee unanimously agreed. Judges described this book as “extremely well written, original, and entertaining. A book that, although wearing its analysis lightly, nevertheless exhibits an impressive depth of insight. The authors show empathy towards their subjects and bring a sense of international adventure to the field of American Studies.” 

Johnny Cash International by Michael Hinds and Jonathan Silverman is a book about a thoroughly American topic – one that nonetheless traverses all imaginable borders. Blending documentary, ethnography, fieldwork, and rigorous research, it’s an in-depth examination of fandom, of international and translocal community, of creativity and hardship, of how music culture can challenge and transcend the divisions we create of class, race, politics, geography.  

Congratulations!”

Bodies and Boundaries in Irish and American Literature, to be held in Dublin City University on September 05-06, 2023, entirely in person.
 
This conference intends to explore twentieth and twenty-first century literature through the lens of literary geography and theories on space, place and embodiment. Indeed, by using the different approaches of literature and geography to “think beyond taken-for-granted categories, levels, and terms” (Hones, 688), literary geography allows a discussion that redefines not only the genres but also how one experiences a text according to different spatialities and bodies. 

Papers addressing the following themes are especially welcomed and encouraged: 

  • Literary geography in relation to Irish literature, American literature, or Irish-American literature (20th-21st centuries) 
  • The body as a boundary 
  • Bodies and boundaries in literature 
  • Fictional accounts on: race; sexuality; gender; disability; social status; the “future body” 
  • Ecocriticism 
  • Political/ non-political bodies
  • Gendering bodies and boundaries 
  • Keynote speakers: June Caldwell, Nessa Cronin, Sophie White and Emilie Pine. 
If you are interested in participating in the conference, whether by giving a presentation or organising a panel, please send an abstract (300 words maximum) and a short biography (100 words) to: laetitia.nebotdeneuville2@mail.dcu.ie. If you want to attend the conference, please send an email to the same email address. Please specify your home institution for both cases. 
 
Deadline for abstract submission and attendance registration: May 22, 2023.

Full details here:

Bodies and Boundaries CFP

 

 

The Irish Association for American Studies is calling for nominations for the following
positions on the Executive Committee:

Postgraduate caucus co-chair x 2
ECR caucus chair or co-chair (x 1 OR x 2)
Vice Chair

Please note that in accordance with the ethos of the IAAS, the committee especially
welcomes nominations for members from under-represented groups, backgrounds, and
ethnicities.

Ideally, we are looking for executive committee members who have experience and
familiarity with our activities, ideals, and membership. There are many ways to get involved
with the IAAS, and new members are very welcome at Association events.

 

  • Nominations must be made by a member of the IAAS
  • Nominees must be members of the IAAS
  • We accept self-nominations
  • All nominations will need to be seconded by an IAAS member
  • All executive committee members, aside from fulfilling duties specific to their role,
    will be expected to attend all IAAS committee meetings throughout the year (there
    are usually 5 meetings per annum)
  • The positions will be elected by members of the IAAS during the AGM (28th April
    2023, University of Limerick)
  • Please email your nominations or any queries to our Secretary Dr Sarah McCreedy,
    at info@iaas.ie by 14th April 2023.

 

Postgraduate caucus co-chair general responsibilities:

  • Attendance at all IAAS committee meetings
  • Attendance at IAAS events, where appropriate
  • Assistance with widening the reach of the IAAS via own networks
  • Working with their fellow Postgraduate caucus co-chair to provide a report at
    committee meetings on activities and feedback from the Postgraduate members of
    the IAAS
  • Running, with their fellow co-chair and with the support of the IAAS committee, the
    annual IAAS Postgraduate symposium (October/November).
  • The term of the appointment is two years, renewable. It is usually recommended
    that the PG caucus co-chairs are in their second+ year of postgraduate study.
     

ECR caucus chair or co-chair general responsibilities:

  • Attendance at all IAAS committee meetings
  • Attendance at IAAS events
  • Working to implement initiatives aimed at benefitting the experience of American
    Studies early career academics on the island of Ireland and beyond
  • Working to raise the profile and membership of the IAAS among early career
    networks
  • Organising an ECR-focused panel/workshop/roundtable at the annual IAAS
    conference
  • The term of the appointment is two years, renewable.

 

Vice Chair general responsibilities:

  • Attendance at all IAAS committee meetings
  • Attendance at IAAS events, and providing support where needed
  • Submitting prizes and other relevant news reports at committee meetings
  • Assistance with widening the reach of the IAAS via own networks
  • Recruiting and chairing prizes sub-committee
  • Prizes marketing and administration
  • Contributing to prizes and bursaries judging where a casting vote is needed
  • Liaising with winners and with Treasurer for announcements and payments, etc.
  • Administering biannual Book Prize submissions
  • Assisting Chair with administrative and leadership tasks
  • Deputising for Chair when needed

 

Irish Association for American Studies ECR Funding Workshop (presented by the IAAS ECR Caucus)

Tuesday 17th January, 12:30-14:00

Zoom registration link: http://shorturl.at/lEY59

A virtual workshop aimed at postgraduate students and (self-defined) early career
researchers, with an emphasis on American Studies. Will feature information on the funding
landscape in Ireland and beyond, strategies and tips for building proposals, and brief guides
to particular postdoctoral schemes.

Presented by Dr Tim Groenland and Dr Caroline Dunham-Schroeter, with guest speakers Dr
Dolores Resano (Marie Skłodowska-Curie Fellow, UCD Clinton Institute for American
Studies) and Dr Gillian Moore (IRC Postdoctoral Fellow, Trinity College Dublin).

 

 

Reading Shirley Jackson in the Twenty-First Century II: The House that Jackson Built
Wednesday, 14 December 2022, 4:30 – 8pm

An online symposium organised by the School of English, Trinity College Dublin, in association with the Trinity Long Room Hub.
‘The House that Jackson Built’ is the second online symposium dedicated to exploring the status of Shirley Jackson’s writing in the work of scholars, creative practitioners, and the general public. Over the past two decades, Jackson’s reputation has undergone a truly remarkable transformation. Despite being one of the most prominent (and commercially successful) American authors of her era, critical interest in Jackson’s work declined in the decades immediately following her death in August 1965. While her works of horror and Gothic fiction have long been held in high esteem by genre aficionados, she was, for quite some time, unfairly considered by many to be a relatively ‘minor’ writer. However, the twenty-first century has seen an explosion in the level of critical and public interest in Jackson’s work, and she is arguably one of the most significant American writers of the present day, as well as her own.
PROGRAMME:
4:30-4:40: Welcome/Ground Rules
4:40-5:40: Panel 1: Jackson’s family: Laurence Jackson-Hyman, Barry Hyman, Gretchen
Hyman and Miles Hyman
5:40-5:50: Break
5:50-6:50: Panel 2: Folk Horror: Kevin Corstorphine and Faye Ringel
6:50-7:00: Break
7:00-8:00: Panel 3: Fictional Impact: Ellen Datlow, Elizabeth Hand, and Paul Tremblay
‘The House that Jackson Built’ symposium brings together writers, academics, and members of Jackson’s own family and literary executors to celebrate her presence in and influence upon contemporary popular culture and thought, on the anniversary of her birth. All are welcome, and attendance is free, but pre-registration is required.

More information/registration available here: 

https://www.tcd.ie/trinitylongroomhub/whats-on/details/event.php?eventid=163419791

.

This event is organised by the IAAS Postgraduate Caucus Co-chair Janice Deitner (TCD Provost’s PPA holder, School of English), friends of the IAAS Dr Dara Downey (Former IRC Postdoctoral Research Fellow based in the Long Room Hub) and Dr Bernice Murphy (TCD School of English), as well as Dr Rob Lloyd (Cardiff University), and Dr Luke Reid (Dawson College).

 

Irish Association for American Studies

Annual Conference

“In/Security”

University of Limerick

Hybrid event: virtual and in-person

28-29 April 2023

The Irish Association for American Studies is an all-island scholarly association dedicated to promoting interdisciplinary American Studies in Ireland. It invites paper and panel proposals for its 2023 Annual Conference, which will take place 28-29 April at the University of Limerick. The hybrid event will be the first IAAS Annual Conference since 2019 to include an in-person element.

“There are others out there on whom my life depends, people I do not know and may never know. This fundamental dependency on anonymous others is not a condition that I can will away. No security measure will foreclose this dependency; no violent act of sovereignty will rid the world of this fact” (Judith Butler, Precarious Life xii).

The theme for the 2023 IAAS Annual Conference is “In/Security.” Inderpal Grewal argues that “constructs of security have come to dominate everyday life in the US imperial state” (Saving the Security State 2). Certainly, questions of security have dominated the US news agenda this year, from the inquest into the breach of the Capitol on 6 January 2021; to geopolitical threats of energy shortages, a cost-of-living crisis, cyber-attacks, and nuclear war; to the FBI’s retrieval of documents endangering national security from a former President’s home. Actual and perceived threats to security – personal, institutional, and technological – have increasingly become the norm in US politics, as allegations of voting fraud and campaigns of intimidation continue to reverberate across elections. Meanwhile, the rising risks of wildfires and storms are a reminder that climate change represents an existential threat to human society that requires us to act now to secure a liveable future.

This year, we invite proposals that consider security, safety, defence, and protection, as well as their opposites: insecurity, precarity, vulnerability, and danger. We will think about security at various scales, the various senses and feelings of terms like “security” and “safe,” and the different ways in which notions of security and its absence structure cultural, social, political, and economic discourses in the Americas.

We welcome papers from all disciplines in American Studies, broadly defined. Possible paper and panel topics may include but are not limited to:

  • Texts and events that dramatize questions of (in)security at various scales: personal, societal, national, global
  • Levels and forms of security forces, threats, risks, defences, protections, allies, and immunities
  • Senses (meanings and feelings) of security and insecurity, vulnerability, and precarity
  • Resource (food, water, energy, housing) security and insecurity, and the geopolitics of resource security
  • Securing the (environmental, biodiverse, just) future; risking the future
  • Financial securities and insecurities
  • Job security, precarity, safety nets, and their absence; welfare and wellbeing
  • Technologies of security – drones, doorbells, digital systems – and their ownership
  • Home security, domestic threats, and safe spaces; private security, personal safety, and safekeeping
  • Questions and definitions of care: carefree (secure, from the Latin securus, meaning without care), careless, and caregiving

The conference organisers welcome individual proposals or panel proposals. Individual participants should submit abstracts of no more than 300 words for a 20-minute paper. Panel proposals will normally consist of an overall proposal of 200 words, plus individual abstracts of no more than 150 words for each of 3 papers for 1½-hour sessions. However, proposals for innovative, alternative panel formats are also encouraged. All proposals should include a short academic biography (50-100 words) for each presenter. Please also indicate if you prefer to attend online or if you are able to attend in person. Priority for online presentations will be reserved for those with accessibility issues or those who are outside of Ireland. Due to limited capacity, we may not be able to meet all requests for online presentations.

Papers from all disciplines in American Studies are welcome, including literary studies, history, politics, economics, geography, science, philosophy, media studies, film studies, photography, art, music and dance, cultural studies, international relations, and others, and from any theoretical or practical perspective. The IAAS and the Annual Conference are dedicated to equality, diversity, and inclusion, and we welcome papers from under-represented groups. The deadline for submissions, to IAAS2023@ul.ie, is 31 January 2023.

All presenters at the Annual Conference must be members of the IAAS. More information is available here: https://iaas.ie/memberships/.

The 2023 IAAS Annual Conference will be hosted by University of Limerick and run by Tim Groenland, David Coughlan, and Clair Sheehan. For more information, contact us at IAAS2023@ul.ie.

The IAAS are delighted to announce the winner of this year’s WTM Riches Essay Prize. Christina McCambridge, an MA student at Queen’s University Belfast, has been selected as the overall winner for her essay entitled “‘Music dismantles history’: A Postcolonial Reading of Musicality and Temporality in the Chamber Poetics of T.S. Eliot and Ishion Hutchinson.”

The WTM Riches Essay Prize is awarded annually for outstanding work in any area of American Studies by undergraduate students and students in the first year of postgraduate studies. More information, including past winners, can be found here.