Eye/I on Canada: Exclusion and Inclusion Voix/Voie du Canada: Exclusion et Inclusion

The 9th Congress of Polish Canadianists / 9ème Congrès des Canadianistes Polonais

21-23 September 2022 / 21-23 septembre 2022 University of Białystok, Poland / Université de Białystok, Pologne

Call For Papers

In the midst of global Covid-19 pandemic, not only Canada, but all the states, experienced challenges they had never faced before. The crisis forced individuals, communities and countries to rethink and question the way modern societies operate on manifold levels. The strain put on health care, education and welfare systems has significantly reshuffled the workplace and family dynamics, exacerbating existing inequalities related to gender, class and ethnicity and affecting communities of colour, as well as other disadvantaged, marginalized and excluded groups in a disproportionate manner. Confined to their homes, many people have found perpetual isolation overwhelming and experienced long-term psychological impacts. As a response to these feelings of exclusion, on both individual and collective levels, new ways of connecting with others have emerged, giving rise to as varied new phenomena as zoom meetings, online panel discussions, workshops and conferences, virtual support groups, and digital cultural initiatives, including exhibitions, concerts, performances and other live-stream events. The economic discrepancies and social injustice aggravated by the pandemic as well as attempts to foster a sense of belonging make us reflect upon past and present forms of exclusion and inclusion.

The organizers of the 9th Congress of the Polish Association for Canadian Studies (PACS) are pleased to invite scholars working across various disciplines, as well as writers and artists, to submit paper and panel proposals which consider the broadly-understood issues of exclusion and inclusion in the Canadian context. We are interested in bringing together scholars from various fields, especially but not exclusively, politics and public policy, international relations, social studies, history, literature and the arts, cultural and media studies, linguistics, etc. We encourage interdisciplinary and comparative perspectives and welcome abstract submissions from postgraduate students.

Though the following list is not exhaustive, papers and panels may address the following themes:

  •   representations of inclusion and exclusion in the arts, literature, film, theatre, the media, etc;
  •   making and revising the literary canon; genre fiction vs. the canon, etc.;
  •   instances of censorship;
  •   historical narratives: silencing/recovering the past;
  •   political, social and communal practices of exclusion and inclusion;
  •   linguistic practices of exclusion and inclusion;
  •   relationships between the centre and periphery (in both literal and metaphorical sense);
  •   conflicting values: individualism vs. communitarianism;
  •   isolation and alienation;
  •   solidarity and participation;
  •   othering and/or belonging (migrants and refugees; racial, ethnic, religious, gender and LGBTidentities);
  •   Indigenous experiences of exclusion;
  •   Quebecois separatism / sovereignty;
  •   representations and discourses of disability;
  •   race, gender, LGBTQ+, age (in)equality;
  •   marginalization and discrimination;
  •   opportunities and challenges of diversity;
  •   borders and barriers (geographic, political, social, economic, etc);
  •   Covid-19-related experiences of exclusion and inclusion, pandemic literature, etc;
  •   digital inclusion/exclusion (new media technologies and platforms, podcasts, blogs, socialmedia, etc.);

    Individual proposals, in English or French, should be 300-400 words long. Please attach a short bio (max. 200 words) to your conference paper proposal. For panels, in English or French, please send the title of the panel and a 250-word presentation explaining the overall focus, together with a 300-400- word abstract and 200-word bio for each participant.

    Deadline for abstracts: February 28, 2022
    Notification of acceptance: March 15, 2022
    Proposal submission address: 9ptbkcongress@gmail.com

    Regular fee (non-PACS members): 600 PLN / 135 EUR / 200 CAD / 160 USD Reduced fee (PACS members): 450 PLN / 105 EUR / 150 CAD / 120 USD Student fee: 350 PLN / 80 EUR / 120 CAD / 90 USD

    Organizers:

    Sylwia Borowska-Szerszun (conference secretary for English-speaking section) Ewelina Feldman-Kołodziejuk (head of the organizing committee)
    Weronika Łaszkiewicz
    Małgorzata Kamecka

    Edyta Sacharewicz (conference secretary for French-speaking section)

    Credits
    The conference organizers would like to thank Justyna Fruzińska for allowing us to include her logo Eye on Canada in the conference materials.

 

The School of English, Trinity College Dublin, in conjunction with the Trinity Long Room Hub, are delighted to be hosting a live online symposium on the twentieth-century American writer Shirley Jackson on Tuesday 14th December, from 5-8pm (Irish time).

 

Shirley Jackson (1916-1965) is perhaps still best known for her short story “The Lottery” (1948) and her horror novel The Haunting of Hill House (1959), but her work also encompassed psychological thrillers, domestic humour, children’s writing, and a variety of short fiction, as well as cultural commentaries and advice for budding writers. After decades of relative critical neglect, Jackson’s critical and cultural standing has been transformed by a surge of academic and popular interest. This symposium explores Jackson’s current literary and cultural standing and asks, “Where next for Jackson studies, both within Ireland and globally?”

 

The symposium will consist of a mixture of live online Zoom panels as well as pre-recorded presentations, discussions, and written material, which will be uploaded to the website and made available to attendees to view in their own time. Asynchronous content will be available on the website (https://shirleyjackson21stcentury.wordpress.com) from 7th December 2021.

 

Registration for the live event is free and open to all. Undergraduate and postgraduate students are more than welcome. To register, go to: https://www.tcd.ie/trinitylongroomhub/whats-on/details/event.php?eventid=156735347

 

To view the programme for the live event, and to access the pre-recorded/ asynchronous content, see: https://shirleyjackson21stcentury.wordpress.com/.

 

Join our Discord discussion: https://discord.gg/2UjjYrtpAQ.

Please contact

shirleycon2021@gmail.com

with any queries.

Transatlantic Studies Association
20th Annual Conference
University of Kent, Canterbury
4-6 July 2022

_________

Call for Papers

Submissions are invited for the 2022 Annual Conference

KEYNOTE LECTURES

Professor Jussi Hanhimäki (Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies)

Pax Transatlantica: America and Europe in the Post-Cold War Era

AND

Dr Sarah Meer (University of Cambridge)

“American Claimants: Transatlantic Tales of Humility and Grandeur”

AND

Professor Mark Webber (University of Birmingham)

“NATO in a Tripolar World: Does the New Strategic Concept Deliver?”

 

PLUS

A Roundtable discussion on:

The End of an Era? The Transatlantic Alliance in International Politics from 9/11 to Covid-19
_________

 

The TSA is a broad network of scholars who use the ‘transatlantic’ as a frame of reference for their work in a variety of disciplines, including (but not limited to): history, politics and international relations, and literary studies. All transatlantic-themed paper and panel proposals from these and related disciplines are welcome.

The conference is organised around a number of subject themes, each of which is convened by members of the conference programme committee. If you would like to discuss your paper or panel proposal prior to submission, please contact the relevant programme committee members. This year’s subject themes are:

Diplomatic and international history
David Ryan, david.ryan@ucc.ie, Chris Jespersen, christopher.jespersen@ung.edu

Political and intellectual history
Joe Renouard, jrenoua1@jhu.edu, Gaynor Johnson, G.L.Johnson@kent.ac.uk

Social, cultural and religious history

Finn Pollard, fpollard@lincoln.ac.uk, Kathryn Gray, kathryn.gray@plymouth.ac.uk

International Relations and Security Studies

Michele Testoni, mtestoni@faculty.ie.edu, Joe Renouard, jrenoua1@jhu.edu

Literature, film, and theatre
Donna Gessell, donna.gessell@ung.edu, Finn Pollard, fpollard@lincoln.ac.uk

Transatlantic memory and heritage 

 Kristin Cook, kc31@soas.ac.uk, Kathryn Gray, kathryn.gray@plymouth.ac.uk 

Latin America in a transatlantic context         

 Robert Howes, robert.howes@kcl.ac.uk, Thomas Mills, t.c.mills@lancaster.ac.uk

Ethnicity, race and migration 

Thomas Mills, t.c.mills@lancaster.ac.uk, Tony McCulloch, tony.mcculloch@ucl.ac.uk

Special subject theme:

 The TSA is pleased to join SOAS and the University of York in welcoming proposals that seek to better understand the UK-US nuclear relationship as enshrined in the 1958 Mutual Defence Agreement (MDA). This arrangement formalizes the US support for the UK’s nuclear weapons system, and regulates exchanges of sensitive nuclear materials and know-how between the two countries. The Mutual Defence Agreement has been regularly renewed since its inception, with the next renewal due in 2024.

 

While the nuclear relationship is commonly thought of as being at the heart of what is referred to as the “special relationship”, there is no academic centre in either the US and UK that has a sustained focus on this topic, and scholarly literature about it is sparse. The TSA thus encourages proposals for papers that elucidate and interrogate the Mutual Defence Agreement and UK-US nuclear relationship, drawing on traditional strategic studies, peace studies and critical perspectives.

 

For queries, please contact Professor Dan Plesch: dp27@soas.ac.uk

 

Conference Format

The TSA fully intends to hold its 2022 annual conference as a full in-person meeting. If there are unexpected and significant limitations on gatherings and international travel, the TSA Management Committee will reconsider the format accordingly. While primarily an in-person meeting, we will reserve a limited number of slots for online panels. These panels must be wholly online (i.e. all presenters and the chair will participate online); individual paper submissions will not be considered for online delivery. If you wish your panel to be delivered wholly online, please explain briefly when making your submission why this needs to be the case and/or why the panel would benefit from this format of delivery. Please note that panels and papers accepted for in-person delivery will not subsequently be considered for online delivery.

 

Other formats

In addition to the subject themes above, we welcome papers and panels on any aspect of transatlantic studies. Interdisciplinary papers and panels are particularly welcome, as are innovative formats, such as roundtables, workshops or multimedia presentations.

 

Submission Instructions

Panel proposals should constitute three or four presenters and a Chair (as well as a discussant if desired). Panel proposals should be sent by email as one document attachment to tsakent2022@gmail.com, and include:

  • 300-word overview of the panel theme;
  • 300-word abstracts for each of the papers;
  • 100-word author biographies;
  • 2-page CVs for all participants.

 

The subject line of the email for panel proposals should read: ‘TSA Proposal-[Last name of panel convenor]-[Subject theme]’ (state ‘Other’ if not falling under listed themes) (E.g. ‘TSA Proposal-Smith-Diplomacy and International History’).

 

Individual paper proposals should be sent by email as one document attachment, and include:

 

  • 300-word abstract for the paper
  • 100-word author biography;
  • 2-page CV.

 

The subject line of the email for paper proposals should read: ‘TSA Proposal-[Last name of presenter]-[Subject theme]’ (state ‘Other’ if not falling under listed themes) (E.g. ‘TSA Proposal-Smith-Other).

 

Please note: all submissions must come to the conference email address to be considered by the programme committee.

Travel Grants

The TSA particularly welcomes proposals from new members and junior scholars. Travel grants of £150 each are available to support early career scholars presenting a paper at the conference. As a result of funding from the Halle Foundation, the TSA is able this year to offer a number of additional travel grants to support early career scholars presenting a paper on any aspect of relations between the United States and Germany.

 

If wishing to apply for a travel grant, applicants should indicate this in the body of the email when submitting their paper or panel. If papers are believed to qualify for Halle Foundation funding, this should be indicated. In addition to the materials requested above, travel grant applicants should include a brief statement explaining why it is important for them to attend the TSA conference. For further details about TSA travel grants, see the TSA website: www.transatlanticstudies.com.


Deadline for panel and paper proposals: 15 January 2021
All paper and panel proposals, and travel grant applications, should be sent to the conference email:

tsakent2022@gmail.com.

 

Contact details

Chair of TSA: Thomas Mills: t.c.mills@lancaster.ac.uk

 

Vice-Chair of TSA: Kristin Cook: kc31@soas.ac.uk

 

Local Organiser: Gaynor Johnson, G.L.Johnson@kent.ac.uk

 

TSA Charity Number: SC039378

www.transatlanticstudies.com

Mission Statement

22 May 2021

 

The DICE Network (Decolonial, Indigenous, and Critical Ethnic Studies Network of the European Association of American Studies [EAAS]) is committed to creating discussions amongst, and connecting, scholars working in these fields. Inherent to the network’s approach is an inclusive participation of our members in the direction of our network and critical a focus on Indigenous, Black, Latinx, non-whitestream, anti- and decolonial scholarship. We aim to create a multi-institutional platform which facilitates deliberations and exchanges on research in decolonial, Indigenous, and critical ethnic studies being undertaken in Europe, on methodological queries and considerations on working in these fields in a European context and / or as Europeans, as well as on increasing connections with our colleagues in North America who work in these and related fields.

 

We thus welcome anyone who works or is interested in:

  • Decolonial and anti-colonial studies
  • Indigenous studies
  • Critical Ethnic and anti-racist studies
  • Black, African-American and / or Africana studies
  • Latinx studies
  • Asian-American and/or Asian-European studies
  • Migration studies
  • Settler-colonial studies
  • Intersectional studies
  • Everyone who works and/ or is interested in related fields 

 

We will hold our first ever network meeting at the 2022 EAAS conference which will take place in Madrid on the 6th-8th April 2022. We will hold at least one network-sponsored panel and one roundtable for which we will circulate a CfP shortly. Future events and publications will keep our conversations and deliberations developing.

 

Anybody interested in joining this EAAS network and putting their name on our mailing list, please contact us at DICEnetworkEAAS@gmail.com by sending your name, email address, and institutional affiliation, as well as your research interests. We promise to keep the number of messages to a minimum while aiming to circulate calls for papers and/or submissions and any relevant network information.

 

All suggestions on the network’s functioning, focus, topics, or activities are welcome.

Thank you for your interest!

 

Best wishes,

 

The DICE Board

Jonathan Ward, Aleksandra Izgarjan, Timothy Petete, and Cécile Hei

Popularizing STEM | Science and Technology in 21st-Century US Popular Culture 15-19 November 2021 (hybrid format conference)

Confirmed keynotes: Gerry Canavan, Charles Adler, Stina Attebery, André Brock, Emily Cox- Palmer-White, J. Jesse Ramírez.
Follow further updates on Twitter or the official conference website!

In 1959, British physicist and novelist C.P. Snow delivered a lecture in which he highlighted the increasing intellectual separation between the humanities and the sciences—the emergence of “two cultures.” While his arguments were clearly anchored in British society, he nevertheless suggested that this emerging chasm was “a problem of the entire West.” To present the argument in a perhaps even more exaggerated manner than Snow did: Not even the most highly educated humanities scholars can comprehend basic physics, while what we today would refer to as STEM professors don’t read “highbrow” literature. Snow came to understand that the situation was not quite as black-and-white as he suggested, which is why he anticipated the emergence of a “third culture” a few years later.

Of course, much has happened in the sixty-plus years since Snow’s iconic lecture. And, indeed, scholars such as Rachel Holland have diagnosed the emergence of a “third culture” and, along with it, third-culture cultural objects. In her recent book Contemporary Fiction and Science (2019), Holland argues that the increasing presence of science in fiction (and, by extension, popular culture) “is, in part, a response to the upsurge in interest […] in popular science.” Holland identifies a “new strand of fiction” that engages with “elements of popular science in a number of ways. These include: researching and relaying information gleaned from scientific publications; challenging or promoting ideas presented by science writers; exploring the moral and ethical implications of these ideas; and testing the limits and capabilities of the novel in relation to scientific discourse.” As some of the elements in this list suggest, science is a tool of power; science is purported to be objective and, hence, often serves as a purveyor of Truth. As such, it has been (ab)used in a variety of ways in the course of history–among others, scientific curiosity drove (and technology made possible) the exploration and colonization of foreign lands, science explained the inferiority of non-white peoples, iconic Nazi doctor Josef Mengele experimented on humans in the name of scientific progress, etc.

Holland’s elaborations also indicate that science and technology have taken an integral place in global society—and the ongoing pandemic has brought this process to the fore. Due to the proliferation of science and technology on television, in films, video games, and other popular media and the attendant use of YouTube and other platforms by STEM fields, it is important to study the dynamic and complex interrelationship between science & technology and popular culture. Indeed, science & technology has infiltrated popular culture. However, this is not a one-way street! “The cultural products that scientific discoveries and developments sparked have become significant parts of the discourse surrounding science,” as Steven Gil rightfully stresses in the opening editorial of the Journal of Science & Popular Culture.

We are particularly interested in presentations that seek to engage with questions of intersectional discrimination in STEM representations in popular culture, spanning from cultural products aimed at dissemination and debate on STEM to texts such as films, TV series, comics and graphic novels, genre fiction, video games, new media narratives.

Suggested fields of analysis might include but are not limited to:

  • STEM dissemination in popular culture: storytelling strategies, (in)accuracy, multimedia programs and projects promoting access, flexibility, and adaptability in STEM education and knowledge, deconstructing the existing barriers within the field and building equality in legitimacy
  • Interrelationship between STEM and Popular Culture: Using popular culture to teach/educate on STEM (i.e., in STEM programs) and teaching about STEM via popular culture
  • Economic discourses and the challenges of capitalism related to STEM in US popular culture and media
  • Representation of STEM in popular culture aimed at children and young adults
  • Intersectionality versus marginalization in the dissemination and communicationof science and technology
  • STEM and Gender Studies :  the portrayal of masculine, feminine, and gender non-conforming individuals in STEM-centered popular media narratives
  • Science, tech, and race/ethnicity: Afro(Latinx), Indigenous, and Chicana Futurism(s), minority perspectives, alternative narratives, borderland spaces
  • Digital technology and virtual realities as safe spaces for marginalized groups
  • The use of science and technology in depictions of the future as critiques or reevaluations of current realities: tech-noir and sci-fi utopias, dystopias, post/apocalyptic scenarios, and retrofuturism 
  • Cyborgs, AI, and the human: representations, conflicts, and horrific developments
  •  Health and technology: care robots and the representation of disabilities, human aging, biomedical issues
  • Representations of surveillance, biometrics, and biological citizenship
  • Tech, science, and the (non)human body: narratives related to experimentation,bioethics, artificial monstrosity, transhumanism, biopunk
  • Pop depictions of STEM: (in)accuracy, “prediction” of future technologies, breaking down the science and tech behind superhero narrativesDeadline for submission: August 31, 2021.Submit your abstract proposal (~ 300 words) at popmec.stem@gmail.com as an attachment, including name, affiliation if any, and contact email. Depending on the proposals and participants’ response, an editorial project might originate from the conference.

The conference will take place on the days 15-19 November 2021 in mixed format:

  • ONLINE | panels and main keynotes
  • IN PRESENCE at Universidad de Alcalá, historical campus, Friday 19 November |2 keynotes + workshop/seminars. If it will be feasible considering the changing COVID-19 related measures, we will allow selected panels to be carried out in person (if their participants wish to do so)Participation fees:
  • FREE for PopMeC members (membership yearly fees: 12€ students / non-tenured / unwaged / retired, 20€ regular)
  • Non-members: 15€                                                                 

 

The conference is organized by the PopMeC Association for US Popular Culture Studies, in collaboration with the Instituto Franklin-UAH located in Alcalá de Henares (Madrid, ES) and the academic research project Fiction Meets Science.Organizing committee: Michael Fuchs and Anna Marta Marini (coordinators), Laura Álvarez Trigo, Paula Barba Guerrero, Paul Mitchell, Dina Pedro, Erika Tiburcio.
On-site organization: Francisco Sáez de Adana, Ana Serra, Carlos Herrero (Instituto Franklin- UAH).

‘Trauma and Naturalism in the Later Novels of Toni Morrison and Philip Roth’

Dr Alan Gibbs

The IAAS was honoured to host Dr Alan Gibbs for the 2021 W. A. Emmerson lecture on June 2nd. 

The lecture was delivered online, followed by a lively and illuminating Q&A. It can be watched back via our YouTube channel. 

Many thanks again to Dr Gibbs for such a fantastic lecture!

Watch the lecture

 

 

The IAAS is a proud sponsor of #Douglassweek, a week-long series of special events and activities celebrating Frederick Douglass’s trip to Ireland in 1845. All events are free and online, and information, including registration, can be found at www.douglassincork.com

 

 

#Douglassweek is the brainchild of Dr Caroline Schroeter, and the result of over a year’s work by a dedicated team of scholars, including the IAAS’s own Dr Schroeter, Dr Tim Groenland, and Sarah McCreedy.

The IAAS Postgraduate Symposium

“Parallel Lives in America”

Virtual Event via Zoom

13th-14th of November, 2020

Last year, the Irish Association for American Studies’ Postgraduate Symposium, titled “The Land of the Unfree”, sought to interrogate the legitimacy of democracy in America. One year on, in the midst of a global pandemic, this legitimacy has not only been interrogated, but put on trial.

In the U.S., the COVID-19 pandemic has both exacerbated and exposed already existent crises: social, political and economic, among others. Referred to by The New York Times as “The Pandemic Inequality Feedback Loop”, research has shown that individuals of lower economic strata and minority groups are both more likely to contract the virus, and to die from it. From bulk buying to wide-spread job losses, the concerns and priorities of American citizens have existed on a wide spectrum according to relative levels of privilege and oppression.

The 2020 postgraduate symposium, taking place in the IAAS’ 50th year, therefore endeavours to investigate “Parallel Lives” in America. In this context, “Parallel Lives” signify the juxtaposition of the wealthy with the poor, those with power to those who are oppressed, and those who discriminate to those who are discriminated against. As the #BlackLivesMatter movement has shown, exposing and resisting the discord between parallel ways of living is essential for social change, particularly in a world where our lives have become more interconnected than ever before.

While this conference takes inspiration from the present moment, we are particularly interested in historical roots, parallels and contemporary repetitions, and welcome transhistorical papers and panels.

To be conducted over the course of Friday and Saturday afternoon on the 13th-14th November, the interdisciplinary symposium will be run as a virtual event via Zoom. Participants will be invited to complete a webinar registration to be able to join the symposium.

300 word proposals for ten-minute papers, along with a short academic biography, are welcomed from PGRs and ECRs working in the field of American Studies across disciplines including literature, history, film, politics, music, art and media. The deadline for submissions is Friday, 9th October, 2020.

The IAAS is committed to the development of postgraduate and early career researchers. Therefore, the symposium will also feature workshops specifically designed for these scholars.

Paper topics may include but are not limited to:

  • Racial/gender/social/economic inequalities in the U.S.
  • The intersectionalities of equality and inequality
  • Widening socio-economic discrepancies in times of American crisis
  • Narratives of resistance, counternarratives
  • Protest literature and movements, particularly #BlackLivesMatter
  • Documenting Protest
  • The role of art and the artist in social change

For more information, or to submit a proposal, please email us at: postgrad@iaas.ie

 

The following Calls for Papers have been announced this month:

27th Biennial Conference of the Nordic Association for American Studies

“What Happened? Continuities and Discontinuities in American Culture”

Uppsala, Sweden, May 20-22, 2021

Deadline – 15 September 2020.

https://naas2021.com/.

The 27th biennial conference of the Nordic Association for American Studies (NAAS) will take place on May 20–22, 2021, in Uppsala, Sweden. The conference also serves as the 11th biennial conference of the Swedish Association for American Studies (SAAS).

Please see the CFP for more information on this years’s theme ”What happened? Continuities and Discontinuities in American Culture.” Although we encourage panel and paper proposals that engage with this theme, we welcome proposals on any topic related to American studies. The deadline for submission is September 15, 2020.

The conference will take place at Uppsala University, Sweden’s first university, located some 70 kms north of Stockholm, easily accessible by train or by flight to Stockholm-Arlanda airport. The conference is open to scholars and students from all countries, but we offer lower registration fees to members of NAAS (Nordic Association for American Studies), EAAS (European Association for American Studies), and ASA (American Studies Association in the U.S.)

 

Humboldt University in Berlin

“Doing Southern Studies Today”

Berlin, January 14-15, 2021

Deadline – 1st August 2020.

In the field of Southern Studies, the first twenty years of the 21st century were defined by attempts to formulate and visualize the future of Southern Studies, as evidenced by publications such as Suzanne W. Jones and Sharon Monteith’s South to a New Place: Region, LiteratureCulture (2002), Jon Smith’s Finding Purple America: The South and the Future of American Cultural Studies (2013), or Zackary Vernon’s Ecocriticism and the Future of Southern Studies (2019) – to name only a few. The “future,” most publications propose, lies beyond traditional narratives of Southern exceptionalism and sectionalism that promote a specific “sense of place” that cannot be found outside the South. A more dynamic and global understanding of the South needs to be implemented if Southern Studies wants to contribute to a critical engagement with current and past cultural and social developments, in and outside the U.S. Despite the expansion of the scope of Southern Studies though, the ‘old’ questions remain: What and where is “the South”? What is “southern”? While “sense-of-place”-regionalism, a rather essentialist and nativist approach to being “southern,” is outdated, the concern with the “place of ‘place’” in Southern Studies remains.

This conference aims to bring together scholars who want to share their work on “the South” and “doing Southern Studies” in an uncommon place: Berlin – a place outside “the South.” We don’t expect definite answers to the ‘old’ questions (although we welcome them). We rather want to explore the trajectories of Southern Studies in and outside the U.S. We owe our title to Scott Romine and Jennifer Rae Greeson who claim that “[d]oing Southern Studies is unmasking and refusing the binary thinking – ‘North’/‘South,’ nation/South, First World/Third World, self/other,” it is “thinking geographically, thinking historically, thinking relationally, thinking about power, thinking about justice, thinking back” (2016: 4). We take their definitions as this conference’s objective and seek an exchange of these thoughts. We are particularly interested in papers that tackle the South as a “multiplicity of communities” (Gray 2002: xxiii), factoring in race, gender, sexuality and ethnicity; the role (or rather the problematic exclusivity) of whiteness in Southern Studies; imaginations of “the South” in popular media; the Global South and the possible transnational routes of Southern Studies. The first confirmed keynote speaker is Martyn Richard Bone (University of Copenhagen), author of The Postsouthern Sense of Place in Contemporary Fiction (2005).

 

Please send abstracts of no more than 300 words and a short biographical info to conference organizers Evangelia Kindinger (Humboldt University in Berlin) and Greta Kaisen (Humboldt University in Berlin) at doingsouthernstudies@gmail.com. The deadline for paper proposals is 1 August 2020.

COVID-19 UPDATE: CONFERENCE POSTPONED
It is with no small amount of sadness that we can now confirm IAAS2020 will not run on 3-4 April.
Given the situation with COVID-19, we could not ethically or intellectually justify going ahead with the conference under the current circumstances.
We are hoping to reschedule the conference for November, to run in conjunction with the PG conference as a large, group effort of celebration and solidarity. We will let you know more about this in due course.
If you would still like to be a part of the conference, please bear with us.
If you require a refund, please get in touch via the conference gmail.

With heartfelt thanks for your understanding and your collegiality.

Catherine Gander and the IAAS2020 team.